film review

Lock-Out/Tag-Out

25.6.14



Lock-Out Tag-Out is the story of a company of people who struggle through their unhappy lives, dealing with problematic relationships and constantly putting their friendship, love and lives to the test. The film delves into those people’s feelings and how tragedy affects their spirit and behaviour, like its subtitle accurately indicates, it’s a study on neglet and regret.


Although writer/director Keith Ten Eyck is drawn to more genre-based, super-natural films, with Lock-Out Tag-Out he creates a very emotional, down-to-earth film that anyone could identify with. Despite the fact that it depicts a very tense, almost nerve-racking story, the film comes out as a sober drama, a composed piece of work that deals with some of the darkest parts of the mind.

The protagonists are elevator union workers, a line of work that is among the highest paying in the world but also ranks as one of the highest in worker fatality rates. When tragedy strikes, what was already disintegrating seems to finally go to pieces.



At twenty minutes, Lock-Out Tag-Out wins you over by the first look. The photography and cinematography are just excellent, with crystal clear image that highlights the film’s tension and honesty and a light blue colour palette that adds to the melancholic mood, while the actors, Andrew Jurcak, Jenna Fournier, Douglas Arthur Hall and Kris Leiter are absolutely in the skin of the characters they play. An additional plus in the film are the extra chills provided by the brilliantly daunting score composed by Keith Richner and Mike Longo.

Watch the trailer below and keep an eye open for Keith Ten Eyck, because you’re probably going to hear more of him in the future.



Keith Ten Eyck on Twitter

ZR

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